Blockchain Blog

IDHack 2016 at Tufts University

Last weekend we attended IDHack 2016, our first hackathon of the year. IDHack is an annual student hackathon at Tufts University for developers, technology enthusiasts, and international development students. The challenge is to build applications that have a positive impact on communities around the world. In this recap we’ll share some more information about the event, and take you through some event highlights and key takeaways.

Roughly 300 students gathered at the Tufts Collaborative Learning and Innovation Complex for the event. Hacking lasted just over 17 hours, and included workshops on niche topics, plus breaks for food to fuel students through the night.

Attending from our team were developers Kevin Houk and Justin Tormey. As the only bitcoin company present, we were the go-to resource for questions on bitcoin, and the Blockchain API.  Kevin also hosted a late-night Hacking with Bitcoin workshop for anyone curious to learn more. The beginning of the session focused on understanding bitcoin, while the second half gave students a detailed glimpse into our API and possible use-case scenarios. Teams stayed comfy with our t-shirt and pillow swag, and they continued coding through the night with the hope of victory on Saturday afternoon.

![Kevin engaging with students during his talk on bitcoin and the Blockchain API.](https://blog.blockchain.com/content/images/2016/02/IDHack2016-5.jpg)
Kevin engaging with students during the Intro to Hacking with Bitcoin workshop.
![Blockchain pillow swag!](https://blog.blockchain.com/content/images/2016/02/IDHack2016-7.jpg)
Blockchain pillows – a must-have hackathon necessity.
While there was only a small bitcoin presence at IDHack, the constant influx of questions from curious students tell us its influence will continue to increase. Bitcoin can be very useful for enhancing [community aid and disaster relief efforts](https://blog.blockchain.com/2015/10/20/the-benefits-of-accepting-bitcoin-as-a-nonprofit/), and we think events such as IDHack can help demonstrate its significance. The competition was intense, and the grand prize winner was a project called [Global Health Corps](http://devpost.com/software/idhack2016), which makes it easier for health care workers to network, spread awareness, and understand prevalent diseases affecting people around the world.

A big thank you goes out to Major League Hacking for organizing the event, and venue host Tufts University. Check out the project submissions from IDHack 2016 here!