Blockchain Blog

Meet the Team: Interview with Marco, DevOps

It was great to get to know Marco, whose role at Blockchain is focused on infrastructure scaling and platform development. In the bitcoin industry, the roles that need to be filled are plentiful, as are the diversity of personalities that fill them. Marco, who joined us after three years of working at Google, quickly shares with me that he is a deep introvert with a passionate drive for improvement in all aspects of his life.

Keep reading to learn more about Marco!

[![Cycling during his first triathlon! ](http://blog.blockchain.com/content/images/2015/09/20x30-SUNE0705-682x1024.jpeg)](http://blog.blockchain.com/content/images/2015/09/20x30-SUNE0705.jpeg)
An intense moment as Marco powers through the cycling portion of his first triathlon!
**Alyson: There are so many creative ways to get to know someone, and early on into our interview you brought up your personality type, [INTJ](http://www.16personalities.com/intj-personality). Can you describe how your personality type impacts your life?**

Marco: Well, I have an almost endless drive to want to improve everything, from the performance of a website to my swimming technique. I’m a perfectionist and I hate injustices. I’m a bit (a lot actually) awkward socially, and often find myself focused on more logical thinking and less emotional expression. I think my personality type is a major factor in my work ethic and efficiency.

A: Your role involves coming up with solutions that help scale bitcoin and Blockchain services. In your opinion, why do you feel Bitcoin is tricky for some people to understand?

M: I think that it stems mostly from a psychological perspective. We are used to having a central authority (government, or parents, for example) that tells us what to do and what not, and it’s reassuring to know that an official body has assumed the major responsibility of managing our money. Of course from a technical point of view, recent economic crises demonstrate that a central authority is not able to govern complex environments where chaotic patterns emerge. In this case a self-organizing network, like the Bitcoin network, is much more resilient.

A: Sum up what is most intriguing to you about bitcoin in one sentence.

M: The technology behind bitcoin is extremely complex, yet the results demonstrate a technology that can be very easy to use.

A: What are some aspects of yourself that you’d like to share with others?

M: I’m very shy, so it isn’t easy to discover things about me. I’m passionate about animal welfare and wildlife preservation in general.

In the tech scene, I’m passionate about promoting diversity in engineering and computer science.

One particular ability I’d like to mention is that when solving problems at work or other areas of my life, I am very good at looking at the big picture.

A: When you’re working on conceptualizing a bigger picture idea, how does your thought process work?  Do you think this skill is essential for the role you’re filling at Blockchain?

M: Rather than focusing in on one object itself independent of other objects, I look at them as connection points to several systems. Object functionality is not isolated. I attempt to understand the work flow and how systems work together to achieve a defined goal. Yes, this skill is essential for my kind of role.

A: Aside from your career-related projects, what is a personal achievement you’re really proud of?

M: As a non-work related project it would have to be arriving at the finish line of my first triathlon.

IMG_20150618_211841

A: Congrats! Was there a particular athlete who inspired you to work towards the goal of a triathlon? Or was it an internal drive to improve that kept you motivated?

M: No, I love swimming and running and so it became natural trying a triathlon. Now I’ve learned to love cycling as well.

A: I’ve read that swimming can often be considered the most intense portion of a triathlon. Was it the most intense for you?

M: It’s intense because usually triathletes are not good swimmers, as they mostly have a cycling background. I’m not a good swimmer, but I love it! So, for me the most intense is always the final portion (which is typically running), when I’m very tired.

I began swimming regularly in open water when I started training. Before that time, I’d always choose to swim in a pool. I definitely enjoy swimming in open water now.

[![Marco's next challenge? A contestant goes head first into the ice cold water at the annual Polar Bear Plunge in Milwaukee. Photo by Mike De Sisti / MDESISTI@JOURNALSENTINEL.COM](http://blog.blockchain.com/content/images/2015/09/polarplunge-1024x642.jpg)](http://blog.blockchain.com/content/images/2015/09/polarplunge.jpg)
Marco’s next challenge? A contestant goes head first into the ice cold water at the annual Polar Bear Plunge in Milwaukee. Photo by Mike De Sisti / MDESISTI@JOURNALSENTINEL.COM
**A: Do you think you’d ever be willing to try an event like the [Polar Plunge](http://www.polarplunge.com/) as a way to conquer your aversion to cold water? In the very least, they seem like an extremely effective way to wake up in the morning.**

M: About the cold water swimming, we are not there yet! I don’t like it too much, but I’m jealous of people that are able to swim in cold water without a wetsuit. I’m learning…

The Polar Plunge definitely sounds intriguing. There’s an open pool close to where I live, and it’s open all year round. There is a group of people that go swimming there every day, even during the winter. Maybe I can join them!

**A: You briefly mentioned animal welfare as an interest of yours. Were you always compassionate towards animals?
**

M: This was something instilled in me by my parents. Growing up, we always had pets around at home.

[![Marco's 2 cats living the good life. ](http://blog.blockchain.com/content/images/2015/09/IMG_20150221_091343.jpg)](http://blog.blockchain.com/content/images/2015/09/IMG_20150221_091343.jpg)
Marco’s 2 cats living the good life.
**A: As a fellow animal lover, I share your views on pet welfare. How did you come to know your two cats?**

M: One of my cats, CP (short for Casse-Pieds, an expression for “pain in the neck”), was found scared and alone on the stairs of our building. I guess he was lonely, because he adopted us! Our other cat, Yoda, was found on a farm and she was the smallest of a group of newborn kittens.

A: If there was one event you could have attended in the past year, but for whatever reason couldn’t, what would it have been?

M: Most definitely the Ironman World Championship, because it’s the most important triathlon event and it’s held in Hawaii!

Find out more about Marco here – maybe a Polar Bear Plunge is in his near future.